The Value Of A Life

Have you ever wondered why things happen? I used to ask myself that question a lot when I was little and into my teens. Every time not so good things happened, the more I’d question WHY?

I hadn’t asked myself that question for a very long time until recently due to a very unexpected event. More on that later.

Here’s something you might not know about me. I’ve been called an “anti-pet” person, but a pro-animals. What I mean by that is that I love animals, but I’ve never really wanted the responsibility of caring for one because I’ve seen it as a huge responsibility.

However, I’ve always cared about pets and as a way to help indirectly, I’ve always donated things and money to organizations that help pets.

I think I formed this mentality about pet responsibility when I was very little. I was probably about 5 or 6 years old and still living in Nicaragua. I had a doggy name Dunky.

I don’t know where the name came from. I’m assuming I was trying to say something similar to that and I just remember calling my dog “Dunky”.

Well, I remember that Dunky died and my parents buried him in the back yard. I was very sad about it, like any other kid would be. But I think I learned about the big responsibility of a life through that experience. Continue reading “The Value Of A Life”

No Secret To Success

You know when you see articles online stating topics like, “10 Things That Billionaires Do Each Day” or “Highly Effective Habits Successful People Practice”? Well, those titles grasp people’s interest because they infer that if people adopt some of those habits, they too might become very successful.

Before I went into entrepreneurship, I’d click on those type of articles out of curiosity and to be honest, I was looking for an answer about how I could become successful.

I wondered if I was doing something wrong or if I needed to adopt a new habit to get to my goal. I also compared myself a lot – which is very damaging to anyone who does it (another topic for later). While a lot of those articles are interesting and they can help you learn new ways to do things, they don’t guarantee success or wealth.

It’s kind of the same rule of thumb as, “if it’s too good to be true, then it is”.

Success Happens Gradually

No one reaches success overnight. No one! Just think about it. Think about very successful people who made it big and their stories. For example, I recently read an article on AARP’s March 2017 issue that Morgan Freeman was 50 years young when he came out in Driving Miss Daisy.

Before that, he’d been a dancer in broadway shows because he’d been advised that desirable actors where those who could act, sing and dance. So, he learned to dance. Continue reading “No Secret To Success”

Free Resources For Start-Up Entrepreneurs

“When did you realize you wanted to be your own boss?” someone recently asked me. It stunned me because I hadn’t even thought of it. It’s always felt as if I’ve had crazy ideas that no one really understood.

But as I thought of this, I started remembering my entrepreneurial attempts.

My first job was when I was 10 years old. I worked for an entrepreneur who would provide his kid employees a box of candy. He’d drive us kids around “rich neighborhoods” to sell the candy bars.

It was hard work for a 10 year old because we had to walk house-to-house and get a lot more NOs than Yeses. We’d make a profit from the sales and the kid who’d sell the most would get a bonus at the end of the day.

Then, I started working for a lady who would give my Mom patterns to sew from home. By the time I was 14 years old, my mother had become a single mom of six.

She’d try to find any way to earn money and take care of us and in a way, I think she’s who taught me to be resourceful and to use what I knew to earn a living. She’s been the best role model of survival in my life.

My younger siblings would help my Mom with minor tasks while the my two middle kids and I helped sew some of the clothes. Later, I asked my Mom’s employer for a job. So, I became her helper at her clothing boutique during the week and I’d go sell the clothes at a high-end flea market with her on the weekends.

While working for someone was not exactly me owning my own business, it felt good to work on my own terms and to chose what I wanted to do. I loved being able to go to school and being able to earn money.

Years later, when I was in the military, I became a Mary Kay consultant. I did pretty well despite the fact that I was not a good seller and I wasn’t into make-up or skin care products.

Later, as I was getting ready to leave the military, I became a Realtor & Real Estate Consultant. While I did great, my career was short lived due to the market crash in 2007.

While in college, I learned about a program called the Entrepreneur Bootcamp for Veterans (EBV) with Disabilities. I applied and was accepted.  Continue reading “Free Resources For Start-Up Entrepreneurs”